Resources        

Homepage

Contact

Calendar

Links

About Us

Photo Albums

       Deer Photo Album

       Elk Photo Album

       Bird Photo Album

       Shed Photo Album

       Misc Photo Album

       Trail Camera Pics

       Video Album

News

Target Ranges 

Other sites of interest 

Big Game Hunting 

Big Game Top Page

Blacktail Deer

Whitetail Deer

Mule Deer

Roosevelt Elk

Rocky Mountain Elk

Bear

Special Permit Species (Goat, Moose, Bighorns)

Predators 

Bird Hunting     

Bird hunting top page

Waterfowl

Upland Birds

Turkeys

Grouse

Bird Cleaning Tips

Big Game Units       

100 series units  (GMUs)  

200 series units  (GMUs)

300 series units  (GMUs)

400 series units  (GMUs)

500 series units  (GMUs)

600 series units  (GMUs)

Big Game Harvest Maps

Bird Areas             

Region 1 counties

Region 2 counties

Region 3 counties

Region 4 counties

Region 5 counties

Region 6 counties

Extras                     

Extras top page

Landowner Access Advice Deer browse information

Dictionary

Recipes

Polls

Ethics

Scent Tips

Watchable Wildlife

Fun Facts

Off season ideas

Jokes and Other Humor

Game Processing & trophy care/taxidermy

Comments

Who's Who

Stories

Your Ad Here - Click

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

photo courtesy D. Polley

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

photo courtesy D. Polley

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Country Lane Campground - Wilbur, WA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

100 series unit information

As more and more information is added to each individual unit's information, we will dedicate full pages to them. 

Hunting success requires significant planning and preparation.  Very few hunters can be successful without properly scouting an area or preparing well before the season starts.  The most serious (and successful) hunters "hunt" year-round.  That is to say, they are continually improving their woodmanship, marksmanship, and knowledge of their quarry.  The most successful hunters are in the field every month of the year.  They know their quarry and their hunting areas very well.  Hunting is an activity that is directly affected by the amount of front-end work a person puts into it.

If you can contribute information click here Submit information (tips, area suggestions, etc)

If you would like to advertise for services located in the 100 series units  click here Contact Advertising

WAC 232-28-331 Game management units (GMUs) boundary descriptions -- Region one.

("opportunity" = relative harvest of that species based on general season harvest statistics as compared to the state average. Special permits greatly increase the opportunity).
 

WDFW Wildlife Areas - Region 1
_______________________________________________________________________

GMU 101-SHERMAN (Ferry and Okanogan counties):

General Season Opportunity (Deer - excellent) ( Elk - poor) ( Bear - good) ( Cougar - poor) (Turkey - good)

Sherman Creek Wildlife area 9,982 acres, is located along the western side of Roosevelt Lake in central Ferry County.  There are deer everywhere in this unit.  You will find that Whitetails are down lower and mule deer are higher. You can get into this unit from either hwy 21 or Hwy 395.  All drainages will hold deer in significant numbers.  Storm King Mountain west of Curlew Lake is an area that holds some roadless access which will hold big mule deer in pockets which are inaccessible.  A significant portion around Storm King Mountain has cooperative road management closures.  These areas provide great access for those who want to boot, bike, or ride a horse.  Also try areas along Lane Creek and Deadman Creek for access to whitetails.

Mostly forest, dominated by Ponderosa Pine and Douglas Fir, the wildlife area has several miles of forest road. Forest is punctuated with open meadows covered by ceanothus. There are also 100 acres of irrigated alfalfa, 5-10 acres of food plots, and a hayed field in front of the WLA HQ. Pheasants are planted annually for public hunting, at the alfalfa fields. Mule and white-tailed deer, and turkeys, are also hunted.

Public land map

_______________________________________________________________________

GMU 105-KELLYHILL (Stevens County):

General Season Opportunity (Deer - excellent) ( Elk - poor) ( Bear - good) ( Cougar - poor) (Turkey - good)

Tons of deer in this unit.  Get into the fringe areas which butt up against agricultural land.   This unit has great potential for deer and has had “second deer” tags available for a few years.  Most of the best areas are on private land.  If you can knock on a few doors prior to opening weekend, you may see that your request is met with happiness.  There is significant deer damage in some of the units.  It may also help by contacting the WDFW to inquire about potential property owners requesting help in deer removal.

STEVENS COUNTY GIS MAPS

_______________________________________________________________________


GMU 108-DOUGLAS (Stevens County):

General Season Opportunity (Deer - excellent) ( Elk - poor) ( Bear - good) ( Cougar - poor) (Turkey - good)

Check out the national forests located up Gillette Rd. Clugston Creek Rd and in the areas around Queen of Sheba.  There are Whitetails and Mulies in this unit, so be careful what you are shooting at and pay attention to the regs.

Bodie Mountain in the North end of this unit has public land available for hunting, from the Clugston Creek rd go right up Bodie Mountain rd.

More public land is available up Williams Lake Rd and Echo Mountain.  Echo Mountain has a bunch of patchwork public/private areas to hunt.  Check out the newer logging areas around water sources.  Early season water sources could prove to be quite productive as the area is really dry. STEVENS COUNTY GIS MAPS

Public land map
_______________________________________________________________________
GMU 111-ALADDIN (Stevens and Pend Oreille counties):

General Season Opportunity (Deer - excellent) ( Elk - poor) ( Bear - good) ( Cougar - poor) (Turkey - good)

Great populations of deer can be found in this unit.  Alladdin mtn  and Seldom Seen mountain have great roads for access.  You can also get up in the areas around Deep lake to find roads and access points.  Whitetails will generally be found in the lower elevations and nearer the roads.  Mulies will be found in the Eastern section of the unit around Linton Mountain and Abercrombie Mountain. Dominion Mountain has year round road closures which provide great opportunity to get away from crowds.
STEVENS COUNTY GIS MAPS

Public land map

_______________________________________________________________________
GMU
113-SELKIRK (Pend Oreille County):

General Season Opportunity (Deer - good) ( Elk - fair) ( Bear - good) ( Cougar - poor) (Turkey - fair)

Most of this unit is national Forest.  Check out the logged and open areas up any of the roads coming off LeClerc rd.  Kings Lake Rd, Harvey Creek, Best Chance rd. and Bead Lake rd. will get you high up into the unit.  Lots and lots of Whitetails in this area.  Early season they will be found high and low.  As the snow falls for late season hunts, follow the snow line.  The farther north in this unit, the more likely you will encounter elk and Mule deer. Molybdenite Mtn holds good populations of Mulies.  Early season, look for bucks up high on benches.  Sullivan Creek holds patches of elk which are becoming a lot more popular to hunt.  Also check out the lower areas which butt up against agricultural land.  These fringe areas hold tons of deer.  See the tips section of this website for more information.

The areas around Sullivan lake, Snyder hill, CCA 15 and Loop Creek have road closure areas which will provide great opportunity for those who want to go in on bike or by boot.

The LeClerc Creek Wildlife Area is 614 acres in one unit, located in Pend Oreille County along the east side of the Pend Oreille River, about 25 miles northwest of the town of Newport. The elevation in the vicinity varies from 2,000 feet along the Pend Oreille River to more than 3,500 feet on the ridges. From Newport, travel northwest on Le Clerk Creek Road for approximately 25 miles. The Wildlife Area is in four sections on the east side of the Pend Oreille River. (excerpt from WDFW website)
_______________________________________________________________________
GMU 117-49 DEGREES NORTH (Stevens and Pend Oreille counties): 

General Season Opportunity (Deer - excellent) ( Elk - fair) ( Bear - good) ( Cougar - poor) (Turkey - excellent)

Just on and south of HWY 20, Little Pend Oreille Wildlife Unit holds a huge number of whitetails and a few mule deer.  Here is a link to a fantastic map http://www.fws.gov/littlependoreille/

The area can be hunted just about anywhere.  You will find that hunting pressure from the roads will quickly push deer on to surrounding private lands or to areas more inaccessible by vehicles.  Choose an area well away from roads and wait for other hunters to push the deer to you.  The Refuge is key winter range for white-tailed deer, and during the early season most of the deer are still down in the valley or at higher elevations. Mule deer, elk, moose, and bear are scattered and relatively uncommon. STEVENS COUNTY GIS MAPS

Buck Creek, Nelson Creek, Donaldson area roads and Winchester 35 road all have road closure areas which allow boot and bike hunters to leave the vehicles behind.  And get away from the crowds.  WARNING!!! Comments we received:  "Unit 117 you have Buck Creek road (which becomes a private road after the 1 mile marker) as good gated access "park and leave vehicles behind" problem is there is no place to park other than the private land which is both sides of the road up to the 4 mile marker (which is all posted), then everything east of the road past that to the 5 mile gate is also private and posted including everything along Beaver creek. I got towed last year parked on the side of the road beside the gated timber company land because its narrow and they want log trucks to go through. They said I could drive up, but couldn't leave my vehicle anywhere that would potentially block trucks-which essentially means no parking." 

Quite a few of the WA timber companies are enforcing the blocked gate issue. We've seen the tow signs on Champion, Hancock, and Weyerhauser gates... I would pay attention to the signs. However, you can use this info to your advantage if you have a mountain bike or know someone who will drop you off at the gate. Most hunters will give up at the lack of parking. Find a good place to park down the road and bike in. A few miles on a bike should only cost about 15 to 20 minutes of your hunting day.

Cottonwood Creek will get you up in the Cottonwood divide area and around the 49 degrees north ski area.  The area holds tons of deer, moose, elk and turkeys..  Again, look for areas away from roads for the most productive hunting.

The areas just south of Westside Calispell Road will provide quite a bit of opportunity for those wishing to get out of the truck.  Calispell Lake area and the backside of 49  degrees north hold a very strong moose herd.

It is also very important to note that this entire unit is patchworked with small farms.  These small farms and plots hold some truly magnificent hunting opportunity.  Contact the landowners before the season, offer to muck stalls, put up hay, or whatever else may they may need in order to secure very productive hunting opportunity.  (landowner advice)

Public land map

 _______________________________________________________________________
GMU 121-HUCKLEBERRY (Stevens County):

General Season Opportunity (Deer - excellent) (Elk - fair) (Bear - good) (Cougar - poor) (Turkey - excellent)

As you can tell by the deer harvest numbers, there are a ton of deer in this unit.  The biggest drawback is that most of this unit is privately owned. Try Mingo mountain area or Gold Creek drainage just south of Kettle Falls, there are some logging units in the area that are accessible.  An anonymous tip to HuntWashingtonState.com advised that the private timber companies in the area who own large sections of the private timberland areas will be prosecuting trespassers and appear to not encourage even seeking permission.   Do not trespass, and if unsure as to the ownership, assume the area is posted and move to a different area.  The Stevens county GIS maps and WDFW's GO Hunt app show DNR lands to access state owned land in the area.

You can also get into Dunn Mountain just west of Addy, the deer will tend to like to be able to feed in the lowland fields and move into the hills to rest during the day.  Take a stand in any area where you notice active game trails. STEVENS COUNTY GIS MAPS

Cooperative Road management Closures by the WDFW can be found around Lane Mtn, Dry Creek, Huckleberry creek, Deer Creek and Little Sweden.  These road closures can provide non motorized opportunity to get away from the crowds.

It is also very important to note that this entire unit is patchworked with small farms.  These small farms and plots hold some truly magnificent hunting opportunity.  Contact the landowners before the season, offer to muck stalls, put up hay, or whatever else may they may need in order to secure very productive hunting opportunity.  (landowner advice)

Public land map

_______________________________________________________________________
GMU 124-MOUNT SPOKANE (Spokane, Stevens and Pend Oreille counties):

General Season Opportunity (Deer - excellent) ( Elk - fair) ( Bear - good) ( Cougar - poor) (Turkey - excellent)

Most of this unit is private, but holds tons of deer.  The whitetails are everywhere and some of the landowners have contacted the WDFW for help.  You could either knock on some doors or you can contact the WDFW offices for possible land owner contact information.

Inland Empire Paper company holds a large portion of the land just to the east of Mt. Spokane.  There is a trespass fee and every person who goes in the unit must have a pass. Blanchard Ridge, Brickle Creek and Spirit lake road will get you access into the area.  Make sure that you stay in WA and not migrate into Idaho.  You can purchase permits at White's Outdoors in Spokane, HICO in Rathdrum, Hauser Market in Hauser Lake and at Lewis Minit Mkt in Deer Park.  Here is a link to IEP

t is also very important to note that this entire unit is patchworked with small farms.  These small farms and plots hold some truly magnificent hunting opportunity.  Contact the landowners before the season, offer to muck stalls, put up hay, or whatever else may they may need in order to secure very productive hunting opportunity.  (landowner advice)

_______________________________________________________________________
GMU 127-MICA PEAK (Spokane County):

General Season Opportunity (Deer - good) ( Elk - fair) ( Bear - fair) ( Cougar - poor) (Turkey - fair)

Primarily all private land holdings either residential or other.  The unit holds great numbers of elk, deer and moose.  If you can get into some of the private land, you have a good shot at getting into some great hunting.

Mica Peak is owned and managed by Inland Empire Paper company.  There is a trespass fee and every person who goes in the unit must have a pass.  Make sure that you stay in WA and not migrate into Idaho.  You can purchase permits at White's Outdoors in Spokane, HICO in Rathdrum, Hauser Market in Hauser Lake and at Lewis Minit Mkt in Deer Park.  Here is a link to IEP   Mica Peak area is enormous, you should find substantial elbow room if you get away from the main roads and trails.  There is one main (well maintained) dirt road that goes to the top of the mountain to service the radio antennas, it's a sure bet that a number of hunters will be using the road as an access point.  Look for deer, elk and moose in the roadless areas.

_______________________________________________________________________
GMU 130-CHENEY (Spokane and Lincoln counties):

General Season Opportunity (Deer - good) ( Elk - fair) ( Bear - poor) ( Cougar - poor) (Turkey - fair)

Primarily all private land holdings either residential or other.  The unit holds great numbers of elk, deer and moose.  If you can get into some of the private land, you have a good shot at getting into some great hunting

Columbia Plateau Wildlife Management Association is a charitable non-profit land management association offering free controlled hunting access to youth, disabled, and other hunters , while providing for wildlife stewardship and good landowner relationships.    CPWMA currently offers two methods for hunting on their properties:

(1)  Regular Seasons Hunters who desire hunting access should fill out our Hunter Request Form and send it to the organization.    A drawing is held at their June  meeting and those drawn will be asked to come to the signup and assigned a place to hunt .  This is free of any charges.
(2) Special Permit Raffle Season
CPWMA  currently is able to offer a raffle process for elk hunting during the months of January, February, and March.  The raffle cost is $10 to hunt a cow elk, and $25 to hunt a bull.  Details are on their website.


_______________________________________________________________________
GMU 133-ROOSEVELT (Lincoln County):

General Season Opportunity (Deer - good) ( Elk - poor) ( Bear - poor) ( Cougar - poor) (Turkey - fair)

Boat access provides you with access to the southern shoreline of the Spokane River of this unit.  You will mainly find whitetails in the lower elevations.  You can also hunt the draws and upper wheat fields if you can gain access to the mostly private land.  There are elk, deer, bear, turkeys and bighorn sheep in this unit.  Not a lot of public land.  Make the effort to contact land owners in the unit in the off season. Check the Lincoln County assesor's website for their Mapsifter application. It is a very useful and quick way to determine the public land blocks in Lincoln county.

Lake Roosevelt Hunting Regs
_______________________________________________________________________
GMU 136-HARRINGTON (Lincoln and Grant counties):

General Season Opportunity (Deer - fair) ( Elk - poor) ( Bear - poor) ( Cougar - poor) (Turkey - poor)

Swanson Lakes Wildlife Area is located in east-central Washington. It lies approximately twenty miles west of Davenport and approximately 60 miles west of Spokane. Swanson Lakes Wildlife Area encompasses approximately 19,000 acres in central Lincoln County. This fairly level, rough topography is called the Channeled Scablands and includes features such as plateaus, buttes, and channels. The land increases in elevation from about 1500 feet in the southwest to about 2300 feet in the northeast. The three main habitat types within the wildlife area are shrub-steppe, riparian/wetlands and agricultural lands. The area is primarily managed for sharp-tailed grouse. Game species occurring on the area include mule deer, pheasants, California quail and Hungarian partridge. (From WDFW website)_______________________________________________________________________

GMU 139-STEPTOE (Lincoln, Whitman, and Spokane counties):

General Season Opportunity (Deer - good) ( Elk - poor) ( Bear - poor) ( Cougar - poor) (Turkey - poor)

Most of this rolling hills prime deer habitat is privately owned.  The Revere Wildlife Area is 2,291 acres in one unit in northwest Whitman County, nine miles southeast of the town of Lamont. Revere is Palouse grassland/shrub-steppe/scabland terrain with seeps and springs in the Rock Creek drainage. It supports mule deer, coyotes, badgers, a variety of raptors, upland game birds including pheasants and quail, and other wildlife species.  Area is popular for hunting, mostly mule deer, upland bird, coyote. (excerpt from WDFW website)
_______________________________________________________________________
GMU 142-ALMOTA (Whitman County):

General Season Opportunity (Deer - good) ( Elk - poor) ( Bear - poor) ( Cougar - poor) (Turkey - poor)

Along the Snake River
Ridpath HMU Army Corps of Engineers – 64 acres  28 miles NE of Dayton off Hwy 261. New York bar -210 acres 24 miles NE of Pomeroy on Hwy 127.  Central Ferry HMU – 288 acres 22 miles NW of Pomeroy off Hwy 127.  Willow bar HMU – 191 acres 26 miles NW of Pomeroy on Hwy 127.  Swift bar HMU – 344 acres 24 miles NW of Pomeroy off Hwy 127.  NIsqually John HMU – 3070 acres 14 Miles NW of Clarkston off Hwy 12.  Numerous draws hold hundreds of deer.  There is virtually no cover except in the v of these draws look for deer to be down low to water and in any seep in the v of these draws. 

_______________________________________________________________________
GMU 145-MAYVIEW (Garfield and Asotin counties):

General Season Opportunity (Deer - fair) ( Elk - poor) ( Bear - poor) ( Cougar - poor) (Turkey - poor)

Best way to access this area is by boat if you are North of Wawawai.  The draws coming down into the snake hold tons of deer.  Watch for them coming down to water.  There is public and private access all up and down lower granite lake.  Downstream from Lower Granite will get you on the South side of the river.  You can take a boat in and hunt the Southern draws where public access is present.
_______________________________________________________________________
GMU 149-PRESCOTT (Walla Walla, Columbia, and Garfield counties):

General Season Opportunity (Deer - good) ( Elk - poor) ( Bear - poor) ( Cougar - poor) (Turkey - fair)

Most of this rolling hills prime deer habitat is privately owned.  No public access is known at this time.
_______________________________________________________________________
GMU 154-BLUE CREEK (Walla Walla and Columbia counties):

General Season Opportunity (Deer - fair) ( Elk - poor) ( Bear - fair) ( Cougar - poor) (Turkey - fair)

 


Great populations of Elk, whitetails, and mulies.  Any of the finger roads coming off of Hwy 12 will get you into the unit.  Lots of fringe areas for deer and turkeys.  Feel free to hunt areas are interspersed all along these roads.  Good availability of either sex deer permits are available. Lewis Pk rd and Blacksnake ridge rd are good bets to get into good populations of deer.

 

The 2005 School Fire and the Columbia Complex Fire burned 154,000 acres collectively.  The areas burned in this unit should provide for great hunting habitat in the next few years as soon as the burned out buckbrush and browse reestablishes itself.

_______________________________________________________________________

GMU 157-MILL CREEK WATERSHED (Walla Walla and Columbia counties):
Permit Only Elk.  Steep country, but... enormous bulls and opportunity.  Very popular unit for special hunt drawings.

_______________________________________________________________________

GMU 162-DAYTON (Walla Walla and Columbia counties):

General Season Opportunity (Deer - fair) ( Elk - fair) ( Bear - fair) ( Cougar - poor) (Turkey - good)

Lots of whitetails, mulies and turkeys in this unit.  The WDFW has done a great job in securing Feel Free to hunt lands in this unit.  Pretty much any drainage out of Dayton will get you in to phenomenal hunting.  The riparian habitat in this unit provides great open spaces and wonderfully brushed draws which hold tons of deer.

The 2005 School Fire and the Columbia Complex Fire burned 154,000 acres collectively.  The areas burned in this unit should provide for great hunting habitat in the next few years as soon as the burned out buckbrush and browse reestablishes itself.

Griffen Peak and Chase Mountain have areas with Cooperative Road closures which can provide for some opportunity for those who want to get behind locked gates and hunt by bike or boot.

Numerous landowner big game damage issues come from the areas around Eckler mountain. (2007 Game status and trend report)  A person could potentially find some willing landowners in this area to allow a hunter some opportunity.
_______________________________________________________________________
GMU 163-MARENGO (Columbia and Garfield counties):

General Season Opportunity (Deer - fair) ( Elk - poor) ( Bear - poor) ( Cougar - poor) (Turkey - fair)

No public access is known at this time.
_______________________________________________________________________
GMU 166-TUCANNON (Columbia and Garfield counties):

General Season Opportunity (Deer - fair) ( Elk - fair) ( Bear - fair) ( Cougar - poor) (Turkey - fair)

 The William Wooten Wildlife Area is located in Columbia and Garfield Counties, approximately 35 miles east of Dayton and 14 miles south of Pomeroy. It is 11,778 acres in size. The Wooten consists of a number of valleys and ridges of the rugged Blue Mountains of Washington. The main valley contains the Tucannon River. This valley is dominated by riparian influences; thick understory, and both conifer and deciduous overstory. The ridges are covered by productive stands of bunchgrasses including Idaho fescue and various other species. North slopes are covered by shrub and conifer forest stands. The lands in and along the Tucannon River are historic wintering areas for big game and receive year-round use by a variety of game and nongame species of wildlife. (from the  Wdfw website.)  Lots of fires in the unit have closed the unit.  These fires will provide prime hunting areas in a few years after the browse comes back.

The 2005 School Fire and the Columbia Complex Fire burned 154,000 acres collectively.  The areas burned in this unit should provide for great hunting habitat in the next few years as soon as the burned out buckbrush and browse reestablishes itself.

_______________________________________________________________________

GMU 169-WENAHA (Columbia, Garfield and Asotin counties):

General Season Opportunity (Deer - fair) ( Elk - poor) ( Bear - poor) ( Cougar - poor) (Turkey - poor)

This unit is mostly comprised of the Wenaha-Tucannon Wilderness area.  The area is steep and rugged.  Very popular area for those people who have pack animals as there are no roads into this area.  Best advice is to find elk or deer on North facing slopes in the warmer days of the season and the South facing slopes after the snow flies and it gets colder.  Hunting snow line is a good way to get into animals.

The 2005 School Fire and the Columbia Complex Fire burned 154,000 acres collectively.  The areas burned in this unit should provide for great hunting habitat in the next few years as soon as the burned out buckbrush and browse reestablishes itself.
_______________________________________________________________________
GMU 172-MOUNTAIN VIEW (Garfield and Asotin counties):

General Season Opportunity (Deer - good) ( Elk - good) ( Bear - fair) ( Cougar - poor) (Turkey - fair)

 The Grouse Flats Wildlife Area is 640 acres in size, and is located in Garfield County about 70 miles southwest of the town of Clarkston. Elevations range from 3,600 feet to 4,160 feet. Vegetation types are fir/ninebark on the north and east aspects, while south and west aspects include pine/pinegrass communities. Elk use the area and feed on the 200 acres of hay fields. With minimal human disturbance and no competition from livestock for forage, elk use has dramatically increased. The area also supports white-tailed deer, mule deer, bear, cougar, and a wide variety of small mammals and birds. Upland game birds include blue and ruffed grouse, and more recently, wild turkey. (from the WDFW website)_______________________________________________________________________
GMU 175-LICK CREEK (Garfield and Asotin counties):

General Season Opportunity (Deer - fair) ( Elk - fair) ( Bear - fair) ( Cougar - poor) (Turkey - fair)

Asotin Wildlife Area and any of the drainages feeding into the area hold great numbers of deer and elk.  Feel Free to hunt lands can be found here and there.  A little bit of snow on the ground in this unit will provide classic hunting for whitetails, Mulies, or elk.  The Weatherly unit is approximately 3,400 acres straddling the Asotin-Garfield county line, due west of the Asotin Creek unit.  At the intersection of Peola Road and Mountain Road, turn left and drive towards the East on Peola Road. Follow the road down and up a grade until reaching an intesection with a paved road. Turn right on paved road and stay on pavement until intersection with Fitzgerald Road. Turn Left on Fitzgerald road and drive East for approximately 3 miles to parking area located along road in elk fence. The 2005 School Fire and the Columbia Complex Fire burned 154,000 acres collectively.  The areas burned in this unit should provide for great hunting habitat in the next few years as soon as the burned out buckbrush and browse reestablishes itself.

Hogback and Triple Ridge area are currently road closure areas after October 1.  A person on a bike or hiking in can access a lot of area well away from vehicles.

Warner Gulch Buildings: From the town of Asotin, head west on Asotin Creek Road. At the first intersection in the road, stay to the right and continue up the creek for approximately 10 miles to the entrance of the wildlife area. At the fork in the road, stay left on South Fork Road. Follow South Fork Road, which eventually leaves the creek bottom at a hayshed parking lot, and continues west up a steep grade. Follow the grade for approximately 5 miles until you come to a parking area on the left near the Warner Gulch buildings. Elk are usually highly visible on Smoothing Iron Ridge, especially in early morning and evening hours. Deer, elk, turkey, quail, chukar, grouse, and many other species afford a variety of hunting and wildlife viewing opportunities.
(from the wdfw website)

_______________________________________________________________________
GMU 178-PEOLA (Garfield and Asotin counties):

General Season Opportunity (Deer - good) ( Elk - poor) ( Bear - poor ( Cougar - poor) (Turkey - fair)

Most of this rolling hills prime deer and elk habitat is privately owned.  No public access is known at this time.

The 2005 School Fire and the Columbia Complex Fire burned 154,000 acres collectively.  The areas burned in this unit should provide for great hunting habitat in the next few years as soon as the burned out buckbrush and browse reestablishes itself.
_______________________________________________________________________
GMU 181-COUSE (Asotin County):

General Season Opportunity (Deer - good) ( Elk - poor) ( Bear - fair) ( Cougar - poor) (Turkey - fair)

 The Asotin Wildlife Area is about 13,815 acres in size and is located in Asotin County approximately 16 miles west of the town of Asotin. Elevations on the Wildlife Area range from 1,800 feet to 4,600 feet. The habitat is known as dry coniferous forest. The dominant tree species on the dry slopes is pine, with fir in the wetter valleys and on north slopes. The major grass is bluebunch wheatgrass.  The area is used primarily by elk during the winter. The area is also a major elk calving range and supports white-tailed and mule deer, bear, cougar, and a wide host of mammals and birds. Upland game birds include blue and ruffed grouse, wild turkey, quail, and Hungarian and chukar partridge. Two releases of bighorn sheep have been made with success. From Highway 129 in Asotin, go southwest on Asotin Creek Road 11.6 miles to Access Area Parking Lot on the left. (from the wdfw website)

 

_______________________________________________________________________

GMU 186-GRANDE RONDE (Asotin County):

General Season Opportunity (Deer - fair) ( Elk - poor) ( Bear - poor) ( Cougar - poor) (Turkey - fair)

The Chief Joseph Wildlife Area is 9,735 acres in size and is located in Asotin County, 30 miles south of the town of Asotin. Elevations range from 825 feet to 4,913 feet at Mt. Wilson, the highest point in the vicinity. Dry grasslands surround riparian woodlands on most of the area. Bluebunch wheatgrass is the dominant bunchgrass. Riparian areas are found along the streams, draws, outwash areas at the mouths of draws, and around the numerous springs and seeps. Most of the species on the area are found either in riparian habitat or very close to it. Since WDFW acquisition of the land bighorn sheep have been successfully introduced; the sparse, nomadic elk herd has increased to approximately 150 resident animals; wild turkeys have been introduced successfully; and pheasant have been reintroduced. Large populations of valley quail exist. Blue and ruffed grouse, as well as Hungarian and chukar partridge use the area. (from the wdfw website)

*harvest information comes from WDFW online harvest reports
 

Home  -- Contact -- About -- Links -- Sitemap

Copyright © 2007-2017 HuntWashingtonState.com All rights reserved.